The Constitutional Principle: Separation of Church and State
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State Constitution (Religious Sections) - North Carolina

Please note that we have excerpted only those sections dealing with religion
Research and editing by Jim Allison

NORTH CAROLINA------1776

A DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

Article XIX. That all men have a natural and unalienable right to worship Almighty God according to the dictates of their own consciences.

THE CONSTITUTION or Form of Government

Article XXXI. That no clergyman, or preacher of the gospel, of any denomination, shall be capable of being a member of either the Senate, House of Commons, or Council of State, while he continues in the exercise of pastoral function.

Article XXXII. That no person, who shall deny the being of God or the truth of the Protestant religion, or the divine authority of the Old or New Testaments, or who shall hold religious principles incompatible with the freedom and safety of the State, shall be capable of holding any office or place of trust or profit in the civil department within this State.

Article XXXIV. That there shall be no establishment of any one religious church or denomination in this State, in preference to any other; neither shall any person, on any presence whatsoever, be compelled to attend any place of worship contrary to his own faith or judgment, nor be obliged to pay, for the purchase of any glebe, or the building of any house of worship, or for the maintenance of any minister or ministry, contrary to what he believes right, of has voluntarily and personally engaged to perform; but all persons shall be at liberty to exercise their own mode of worship: -- Provided, That nothing herein contained shall be construed to exempt preachers of treasonable or seditious discourses, from legal trial and punishment."

Article XLI. That a school or schools shall be established by the Legislature, for the convenient instruction of youth, with such salaries to the masters, paid by the public ... and all useful learning shall be duly encouraged and promoted, in one or more universities."

The essence of these provisions were in force in 1876.